Saturday, 5 August 2017

Powering a Thorium nuclear device


231Th is not radioactive. We need 233Th. To knock this up to 233U, we want 4 neutrons. And get out 2 electrons.
1 231Th+2n0->233U+2e-
Two of the neutrons have become protons. To increase the atomic number, from Th to U. So we have done 21st century alchemy. We have changed the element.
if we shine a radiant strip on Thorium, we can unwind the element t ogold
1 231Th+34e-->197Au+34n0
The Thorium reactor is probably a lot more important. I will publish this on the internet, as very few people will have the tecknology to use this.
We fill a glass tube with uranium waste from a nuclear reactor. We half fill it with H gas (we use a glass tube). We strike up a H plasma, and consume the waste.

Physics[edit]

Main article: Fission product yield
See also: Radioactive decay
Medium-livedfission products
Prop:
Unit:
t½
(a)
Yield
(%)
Q *
(keV)
βγ *
4.76
0.0803
252
βγ
10.76
0.2180
687
βγ
14.1
0.0008
316
β
28.9
4.505
2826
β
30.23
6.337
1176
βγ
43.9
0.00005
390
βγ
96.6
0.5314
77
β
Prop:
Unit:
Yield
(%)
Q *
(keV)
0.211
6.1385
294
β
0.230
0.1084
4050
βγ
0.327
0.0447
151
β
1.53
5.4575
91
βγ
2.3 
6.9110
269
β
6.5 
1.2499
33
β
15.7 
0.8410
194
βγ
Hover underlined: more info
The radioactivity of all radioactive waste diminishes with time. All radionuclides contained in the waste have a half-life—the time it takes for half of the atoms to decay into another nuclide—and eventually all radioactive waste decays into non-radioactive elements (i.e., stable nuclides). Certain radioactive elements (such as plutonium-239) will remain hazardous to humans and other creatures for hundreds of thousands of years. Other radionuclides remain hazardous for millions of years. Thus, these wastes must be shielded for centuries and isolated from the living environment for millennia.[2] Since radioactive decay follows the half-life rule, the rate of decay is inversely proportional to the duration of decay. In other words, the radiation from a long-lived isotope like iodine-129will be much less intense than that of a short-lived isotope like iodine-131.[3] The two tables show some of the major radioisotopes, their half-lives, and their radiation yield as a proportion of the yield of fission of uranium-235.
The energy and the type of the ionizing radiation emitted by a radioactive substance are also important factors in determining its threat to humans.[4] The chemical properties of the radioactive element will determine how mobile the substance is and how likely it is to spread into the environment and contaminate humans.[5] This is further complicated by the fact that many radioisotopes do not decay immediately to a stable state but rather to radioactive decay products within a decay chain before ultimately reaching a stable 
The trick is that a H plasma will convert H gas, into neutrons.
3 H+PL-n0
Neutrons bond with the radioactive isotopes – and causes them to fission in 1/10th of a second. We do get heat, but I would propose we throw this heat away to the sea. As you could not sell the energy from radioactive rods being made safe.
So the Thorium gets knocked up to 233U, which fission. And the isoptopes are each enriched and fisison. So the Thorium ends up as heat. Light and X-rays
4 Th+4no->E3+L+X-ray
We are talking about 1g or thorium powering a city for a century. We do not reprocess the Thorium, when the tube has lost enough weight, we refill it, recharge the Hydrogen, and we are goof for another 5 centuries.

And Thorium is VERY abundant. No enrichment – the H plasma does that for us. No CO2. No Fossil Fuels burn.

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